© 2019 TRI

PROMOTING TECHNOLOGY, SCIENCE, & ART

The Rover Institute engages in research to advance geospatial science in new avenues. TRI's projects leverage technology, science, and art to promote awareness of critical global issues.

WEB MAPPING

MAPPING THE HUMAN IMPACT


The Rover Institute is currently working on a web map of the negative impacts of human activity on a global scale. The project is a non-for-profit endeavor, incorporating content from various artists and organizations from around the world. Through this project, TRI is blending technology, science, and art to promote critical issues to a global audience.


Click here to see the alpha release of the Human Impact Map.


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Figure 1. Screenshots of the Human Impact Map.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENTS

DATA COLLECTION & DESKTOP STUDIES


TRI has expereince producing environmental impact assessments. We specialize in the geospatial component of an EA or EIS, which is critical to conducting a thorough analysis of the affected environment. Our experience in data collection, geospatial analysis, scientific writing, and cartography, enable us produce products that meet the guidlines defined by the NEPA and CEQA processes. Our experience with graphic design also enables us to produce infographics and other visual products to improve upon traditional data displays.


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Figure 1. Map sample.

AGRICULTURE

MAXIMIZING YIELDS AND REDUCING COSTS


Data collection from the air and on the ground can provide farmers and ranchers with the data they need to maximize yields and reduce costs. TRI has worked with ranchers in the San Juaquin Valley to explore methods of data collection for agriculture via sUAS and mobile mapping techniques.


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Figure 1. Aerial image of deep ripping around 30 foot buffers established around protected vernal pool habitat.


Figure 2. Sample map created to define the location of an easement for agricultural access.

NATURAL RESOURCES

MAPPING RIPARIAN ZONES


Mapping riparian zones can be a critical step in assessing their ecological value. Digital elevation models generated during baseflow periods can be used to determine water volume and depths throughout waterways. This information can be used to generate models of riverine systems. In a pilot study, TRI used a sUAS and structure-from-motion software to generate a digital surface modal of a portion of the East Fork of the San Gabriel River in Southern California. Results demonstrate that sUAS can effectively be used to generate digital elevation products of riverine habitat of high spatial and temporal resolutions.


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Figure 1. GIS products for a section of the East Fork of the San Gabriel River developed from data acquired with a small unmanned aircraft system.

GEOSPATIAL VISUALIZATIONS

A BLEND OF SCIENCE AND ART


The results of scientific research are often too dry to appeal to a broad audience. Bar charts, line graphs, and dense textual data often evoke more yawns than applause. Engaging audiences requires a touch of artistry that captivates the eye. Cartography has long been a way to engage audiences. Today, interactive web maps, infographics, and other graphic and video displays can present scientific data in a new light that audiences respond to with interest and excitement. TRI is devoted to developing new and unique ways to present scientific data.


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Figure 1. Visualization of Yosemite Valley developed by combining LiDAR data with NAIP imagery.

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